Shoelast

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kridhond
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Re: Shoelast

Postby kridhond » Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:43 pm

Regarding the nummer of control points for sole contour: my suggestion would be: if you devide a sole in 12 equal parts, for an average foot you land on "interesting anatomical areas", e.g. base of 5th metatarsal which is the start to measure waist (IMHO).

For an actual foot, you would be able to drag these points, e.g. to the actual position of base of 5th metatarsal but you would be close to start with and I think you would have enough points in the sole contour to design it properly.

Maybe heel and top would need extra points for aesthetics.

Did we think of the obvious that we have left and right foot or is our model easily usable for both?
Leatherman
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Re: Shoelast

Postby Leatherman » Mon Feb 27, 2017 4:38 pm

Hello,
yes we have started indeed with the insole and we have divided the insole in twelve parts, but as per first experience the classical 12 division, which gives us 22 cv's, is not sufficient for creating an about 1 ft long object in a smooth flow. Quite surprisingly for me as well, but as you can see yourself, the shape is still far away from what it should. My guess for the heel area is in the range of 6 plus one for the heel center in the first division, than up to division 8 it looks ok, but than again it looks like to increase at least another 4 (2 inside and 2 outside) for each division. If the toe is in a flow fine, but for any square or pointed version again the cv's has to be increased. But whatever necessary we need to add finally :)
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Andre
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microelly2
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Re: Shoelast

Postby microelly2 » Sun Mar 05, 2017 7:13 pm

kridhond wrote:Regarding the nummer of control points for sole contour: my suggestion would be: if you devide a sole in 12 equal parts, for an average foot you land on "interesting anatomical areas", e.g. base of 5th metatarsal which is the start to measure waist (IMHO).

For an actual foot, you would be able to drag these points, e.g. to the actual position of base of 5th metatarsal but you would be close to start with and I think you would have enough points in the sole contour to design it properly.

Maybe heel and top would need extra points for aesthetics.

My idea at the moment is to have slices which follow the anatomy of the foot.
The model allows to add slices if needed and to move,rotate and scale the slices. All theses slices are Draft BSplines which are easy to edit
and the use of Part Design Sketcher Bsplines will be possible too.

bp_400.png
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bp_398.png
bp_398.png (488 KiB) Viewed 288 times



Did we think of the obvious that we have left and right foot or is our model easily usable for both?

With FreeCAD we can simply mirror an object.
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microelly2
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Re: Shoelast

Postby microelly2 » Mon Mar 06, 2017 6:24 pm

A way to get personal data is to scan a foot or shoe and create some cuts which can be the basis for the needed curves.
Because the points of a mesh are not placed in a regular way some approximations of the point subclouds are useful.
I used the scipy median filter to get fast results.

bp_402.png
bp_402.png (102.79 KiB) Viewed 258 times

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Iw-jl0sEGU
kridhond
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Re: Shoelast

Postby kridhond » Mon Mar 06, 2017 8:24 pm

Hi

Good to have you back :)

Amazing what progress the model is making. The feature of a plane cut is really interesting.

What it should be able to do is to import a 3d scan of a foot and align the scan with the model. Next for each plane cut, you see 2 curves: one is from the 3d scan and the other is from the model. Finally you drag and modify the curve from the model to adjust the model.

Typically the cut planes are vertical and predefined to be each 4% of the total length (25 cuts). However, being able to rotate and move a cut plane could be interesting in some cases.

B.R. Kristof
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microelly2
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Re: Shoelast

Postby microelly2 » Mon Mar 06, 2017 9:06 pm

kridhond wrote:
What it should be able to do is to import a 3d scan of a foot and align the scan with the model. Next for each plane cut, you see 2 curves: one is from the 3d scan and the other is from the model. Finally you drag and modify the curve from the model to adjust the model.

This step can be done by a script. If we know what the essential curves of a foot are, we can locate them on the scan and then generate the curves for the last. The main task is to find a small number of such curves. When we have a small number of poles then modifications are easier to perform.

A good inspiration for me is always makehuman. http://www.makehuman.org/
one mesh/model for all cases and lots of parameters to get almost all possibilities.
Typically the cut planes are vertical and predefined to be each 4% of the total length (25 cuts).

I will create a version of my cut script which does exactly this to see how we can use it.
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microelly2
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Re: Shoelast

Postby microelly2 » Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:23 pm

Typically the cut planes are vertical and predefined to be each 4% of the total length (25 cuts).
bp_403.png
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kridhond
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Re: Shoelast

Postby kridhond » Tue Mar 07, 2017 6:34 pm

Nice!! That looks right!

I am working on an instruction of geometric preconditions for an average foot. With these formulas the model would build a last which can be used to make shoes you can actually wear and walk with. For example the tip of the last should be cleared from the ground depending on heel rise and length of the last. If you don't respect these "rules" you end up with shoes impossible to walk with.

Thanks to the cuts, in a final stage we can modify the last to better fit feet that aren't average (e.g. like we said yesterday by importing a 3d scan to see where the last is smaller than the foot that should fit the shoe).

From what I've seen so far we have almost all pieces to make the puzzle complete!

I'll try to work on it this week but I think it will be sunday before I can send it.

To avoid excess manual work adjusting several cuts, would it be possible to tell the program to accept anything that is outside the model as model between cut x and y?
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microelly2
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Re: Shoelast

Postby microelly2 » Tue Mar 07, 2017 8:54 pm

kridhond wrote:Nice!! That looks right!

I am working on an instruction of geometric preconditions for an average foot. With these formulas the model would build a last which can be used to make shoes you can actually wear and walk with. For example the tip of the last should be cleared from the ground depending on heel rise and length of the last. If you don't respect these "rules" you end up with shoes impossible to walk with.

I'm not a shoe maker but I love "natural" walking. So I think it's a good idea to support this project. :)
And input is welcome. I have already learned much about shoe design from the conversation with Leatherman.

I only need special shoes for dance and climbing :lol: , all the other cases I use https://www.leguano.eu/

From what I've seen so far we have almost all pieces to make the puzzle complete!
I'll try to work on it this week but I think it will be sunday before I can send it.

I have to go on a business trip for the rest of the week, so we have no hurry.
To avoid excess manual work adjusting several cuts, would it be possible to tell the program to accept anything that is outside the model as model between cut x and y?

yes, we will make intuitive dialogs/mouse click actions to select the places where cuts are needed.
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regis
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Re: Shoelast

Postby regis » Wed Mar 08, 2017 5:11 am

Wow just discovered this post for the first time. This is all amazing stuffs. :D