Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

A subforum specific to the development of the OpenFoam-based workbenches ( Cfd https://github.com/qingfengxia/Cfd and CfdOF https://github.com/jaheyns/CfdOF )

Moderator: oliveroxtoby

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Crossleyuk
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby Crossleyuk » Wed Jan 30, 2019 11:04 pm

Big smile from me Thomas and Oliver!!

Seriously, you have both allowed my to know how much I need to learn in order to make the dramatic steps forward that I aim to take. Now I have the roots for the CFD in place I need to concentrate on ParaView so I can put my own CFD models together for a vortex flow device. So many many more leasons to learn and your support will mean a great deal.

Thanks guys, hope to buy you a beer or a coffee one day!!

:lol: 8-) :idea: :ugeek:
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oliveroxtoby
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby oliveroxtoby » Thu Jan 31, 2019 10:31 am

Crossleyuk wrote:
Wed Jan 30, 2019 11:08 am
Hi Oliver,

Yet again I'm very impressed and grateful for your efforts and support. After checking the boundary naming I realised that I had used a space in four boundary names, eg, "Input 1". I removed all the spaces and it has worked fine now.

Bloody marvellous, as we say here in England :lol:

Cheers man!! 8-)

Michael
Thanks for the compliments! Glad you're finding it useful :-)
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Crossleyuk
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby Crossleyuk » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:42 am

Hey Guys,

Just a little fun observation. I've moved on again and gone back to the FreeCad tutorials as the next step in my self training. Started the Multi-Region Mesh and all went fine on my Dell Latitude i5 4GB notebook. ;)

I've been expecting to upgrade as I progressed so ordered my Dell G7 i7 16GB that will be here in two days. Starting to mesh the 500x500x4000 tube has confirmed the need for the upgrade. It's still meshing after 69000 seconds, so 20 hours on the horizon.

No concerns, just a smile with an intention of moving onto a smaller mesh of my own after comparing the i7 performance.

Thanks again, loving this!! :lol: :ugeek:

Michael
Syres
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby Syres » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:52 am

Crossleyuk wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:42 am
It's still meshing after 69000 seconds, so 20 hours on the horizon.
I run an i5 with a bit more memory but that sounds like a fault/incorrect setting not a lack of hardware, the longest 3D Cfmesh has run on my PC is probably 8 minutes. I'm not immediately familiar with the tutorial but I'd just double check all the settings are absolutely correct particularly around decimal points.
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Crossleyuk
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby Crossleyuk » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:56 am

Thanks Syres, I was wondering if there was something wrong. I'll let it run and see what happens when I start again on my new notebook. Still a lot to learn :)

Cheers

Michael
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Crossleyuk
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby Crossleyuk » Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:24 pm

Hi Again,

I now understand. The model was very large and of course it was taking a long time. It finally finished meshing after 24 hours. I dramatically reduced the size and refined the mesh. it's now meshing in a couple of minutes and all is good. I've again learned a hell of a lot so thanks guys!!

My i7 16GB arrived today so can't wait to see the difference.

I'll stay in touch!!

Michael
wafi
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby wafi » Sun Mar 03, 2019 3:17 pm

hm ... I do not find the mistake ...

What I trying to do is to have a boat in water with a heeling angle and a drift angle. So far so good. The initialization zone is defined by a box with water and in this case 4,8m/s x velocity, the initialization zone is about 5m deep, starting from waterline of the boat. Above there should be 3m atmosphere with an opening, and ambient pressure.
What I would expect is of cause a different pressure at the hull and waves between the boundary atmosphere / water and what I also would expect is that I able to see this wave effect by using the alpha water figure in paraview to see this boundary. I know this from other examples i.e. the wigley hull or DCH hull of openfoam tutorials.
But ... I not able to see this boundary atmosphere / water nor the waves. So I assume I made a mistake, but I can not find it. Perhaps someone has an idea. In my point of view the boundary atmosphere / water is not really defined correctly. Unfortunately the file size is too big to attach.

Peter
wafi
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby wafi » Sun Mar 03, 2019 6:56 pm

here a similar modell, but without the boat itself, instead a simpel box to substitute. Effect is nearly same as with a real boat.
Attachments
test.FCStd
(21.11 KiB) Downloaded 17 times
thschrader
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby thschrader » Mon Mar 04, 2019 12:27 am

@wafi:
here is a little "inspiration" :)
dambreak_2D.FCStd
(18.36 KiB) Downloaded 20 times
wafi
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Re: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workbench using OpenFOAM

Postby wafi » Tue Mar 05, 2019 7:46 pm

Hi Thomas

it`s more the problem you`ve solved with the pirat in the german forum. I tried to use that example, but it seems that the program changed a little bit.

regards
Peter